lamellae lamentae

I'm Mike. I'm a biologist concentrating on herpetology, currently employed as curator of a large, privately owned (but open to the public) herp collection. I also enjoy photography. I built this tumblr so my photos could be shared with credit. Thanks to those of you that have supported photographers by including credits.

If you'd like to see more of my photos, you can check them out at my Flickr page.

Yonahlossee Salamander, Plethodon yonahlossee
Photo by Mike Martin
Turquoise Dwarf Gecko, Lygodactylus williamsi

Photo by Mike Martin
Yonahlossee Salamander, Plethodon yonahlossee
Photo by Mike Martin
Dwarf Waterdog, Necturus punctatus
Photo by Mike Martin
Southern Hognose Snake, Heterodon simus.
Photo by Mike Martin
Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake, Sistrurus miliarius miliarius.
Photo by Mike Martin
Blood Python, Python brongersmai.  Look closely and you can see the egg tooth.
Photo by Mike Martin
Pine Barrens Treefrog, Hyla andersonii

Photo by Mike Martin
Hatchling Ashy Gecko, Sphaerodactylus elegans.
Photo by Mike Martin
earthlynation:

One Day Old Veiled Chameleon by Mike Martin

I don’t know if it’s ‘shameless’ to plug myself, but since it’s my photo…I have a Tumblr, too.

earthlynation:

One Day Old Veiled Chameleon by Mike Martin

I don’t know if it’s ‘shameless’ to plug myself, but since it’s my photo…I have a Tumblr, too.

Hatchling Veiled Chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus
by Mike Martin
fuckinglovescience:

 Uroplatus phanaticus 
The incredible satanic leaf-tailed gecko is a master of disguise, with a body that superbly mimics a dead leaf. Its twisted body, veined skin, and tail which looks remarkably like it has been nibbled at by insects or rotted by decay, all help this reptile blend into the foliage of its habitat. The satanic leaf-tailed gecko varies in colour, but is often mottled brown, and small black dots on the underside help distinguish it from similar species. Geckos possess no eyelids, just a transparent covering over their eyes, and so they use their long, mobile tongues to wipe away any dust or debris that gets into the eye. It has often been debated whether the satanic leaf-tailed gecko is the same species as U. ebenaui (the Nosy Bé flat-tailed gecko), but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko possesses more, and longer, spines on the head, body and trunk.

1. It’s Uroplatus phantasticus, not Uroplatus phanaticus.  The latter is just the nickname I chose for my Flickr account, to which you didn’t feel the need to attribute my image (unless that was your attribution, in which case it would be courteous if you actually linked the source).
2. I don’t know where you got the information you stated in the blurb, but “small black dots on the underside” do not distinguish it from similar species.
3. There are geckos that possess eyelids.  There are geckos in the family Eublepharidae that have eyelids.
4. It has not often been debated whether U. phantasticus and U. ebenaui are the same species.  The current debate lies in just how many cryptic species compose the species we currently refer to as U. phantasticus, U. ebenaui, U. finiavana, and U. malama.
5. U. ebenaui and U. phantasticus (as we currently refer to them) are most easily differentiated based on tail length, not number and size of spines.

fuckinglovescience:

 Uroplatus phanaticus 

The incredible satanic leaf-tailed gecko is a master of disguise, with a body that superbly mimics a dead leaf. Its twisted body, veined skin, and tail which looks remarkably like it has been nibbled at by insects or rotted by decay, all help this reptile blend into the foliage of its habitat. The satanic leaf-tailed gecko varies in colour, but is often mottled brown, and small black dots on the underside help distinguish it from similar species. Geckos possess no eyelids, just a transparent covering over their eyes, and so they use their long, mobile tongues to wipe away any dust or debris that gets into the eye. It has often been debated whether the satanic leaf-tailed gecko is the same species as U. ebenaui (the Nosy Bé flat-tailed gecko), but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko possesses more, and longer, spines on the head, body and trunk.

1. It’s Uroplatus phantasticus, not Uroplatus phanaticus.  The latter is just the nickname I chose for my Flickr account, to which you didn’t feel the need to attribute my image (unless that was your attribution, in which case it would be courteous if you actually linked the source).

2. I don’t know where you got the information you stated in the blurb, but “small black dots on the underside” do not distinguish it from similar species.

3. There are geckos that possess eyelids.  There are geckos in the family Eublepharidae that have eyelids.

4. It has not often been debated whether U. phantasticus and U. ebenaui are the same species.  The current debate lies in just how many cryptic species compose the species we currently refer to as U. phantasticus, U. ebenaui, U. finiavana, and U. malama.

5. U. ebenaui and U. phantasticus (as we currently refer to them) are most easily differentiated based on tail length, not number and size of spines.

(Source: oh4theloveofscience)

Hatchling Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus) takes a rest in the process of hatching.
by Mike Martin
Early instar of the Spun Glass Slug Caterpillar, a.k.a. Beutenmueller’s Slug Moth Caterpillar, Isochaetes beutenmuelleri.  Adults look slightly different, but don’t touch this fuzzy caterpillar, those hairs can sting!
Photo by Mike Martin
Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake, Sistrurus miliarius miliarius
by Mike Martin