lamellae lamentae

I'm Mike. I'm a biologist concentrating on herpetology. I also enjoy photography. I built this tumblr so my photos could be shared with credit (many of my photos were being linked without any credit, which only feeds the popularity of the blog that links the photos, not the photographers that put the effort into making the photos), but after about a year I realized that people were still taking from my Flickr account and practically no one reblogged from this account. So I gave up. I won't be posting any new content here any longer.

If you'd like to see more of my photos, you can check them out at my Flickr page.

Time to move on

Well, I started my tumblr page because I found that my photos were being taken from my Flickr account and posted here without any attribution.  It’s rare that I watermark my images because I dislike the way it distracts from the content of the image itself.  But I’ve found that starting a page like this is no match for other users that manage to spend all day posting and reblogging dozens, if not hundreds of other peoples’ photos.  So rather than upload my recent photos, I’m going to leave it to others to dredge up my photos on their own. 

earthlynation:

One Day Old Veiled Chameleon by Mike Martin

I don’t know if it’s ‘shameless’ to plug myself, but since it’s my photo…I have a Tumblr, too.

earthlynation:

One Day Old Veiled Chameleon by Mike Martin

I don’t know if it’s ‘shameless’ to plug myself, but since it’s my photo…I have a Tumblr, too.

Hatchling Veiled Chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus
by Mike Martin
fuckinglovescience:

 Uroplatus phanaticus 
The incredible satanic leaf-tailed gecko is a master of disguise, with a body that superbly mimics a dead leaf. Its twisted body, veined skin, and tail which looks remarkably like it has been nibbled at by insects or rotted by decay, all help this reptile blend into the foliage of its habitat. The satanic leaf-tailed gecko varies in colour, but is often mottled brown, and small black dots on the underside help distinguish it from similar species. Geckos possess no eyelids, just a transparent covering over their eyes, and so they use their long, mobile tongues to wipe away any dust or debris that gets into the eye. It has often been debated whether the satanic leaf-tailed gecko is the same species as U. ebenaui (the Nosy Bé flat-tailed gecko), but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko possesses more, and longer, spines on the head, body and trunk.

1. It’s Uroplatus phantasticus, not Uroplatus phanaticus.  The latter is just the nickname I chose for my Flickr account, to which you didn’t feel the need to attribute my image (unless that was your attribution, in which case it would be courteous if you actually linked the source).
2. I don’t know where you got the information you stated in the blurb, but “small black dots on the underside” do not distinguish it from similar species.
3. There are geckos that possess eyelids.  There are geckos in the family Eublepharidae that have eyelids.
4. It has not often been debated whether U. phantasticus and U. ebenaui are the same species.  The current debate lies in just how many cryptic species compose the species we currently refer to as U. phantasticus, U. ebenaui, U. finiavana, and U. malama.
5. U. ebenaui and U. phantasticus (as we currently refer to them) are most easily differentiated based on tail length, not number and size of spines.

fuckinglovescience:

 Uroplatus phanaticus 

The incredible satanic leaf-tailed gecko is a master of disguise, with a body that superbly mimics a dead leaf. Its twisted body, veined skin, and tail which looks remarkably like it has been nibbled at by insects or rotted by decay, all help this reptile blend into the foliage of its habitat. The satanic leaf-tailed gecko varies in colour, but is often mottled brown, and small black dots on the underside help distinguish it from similar species. Geckos possess no eyelids, just a transparent covering over their eyes, and so they use their long, mobile tongues to wipe away any dust or debris that gets into the eye. It has often been debated whether the satanic leaf-tailed gecko is the same species as U. ebenaui (the Nosy Bé flat-tailed gecko), but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko possesses more, and longer, spines on the head, body and trunk.

1. It’s Uroplatus phantasticus, not Uroplatus phanaticus.  The latter is just the nickname I chose for my Flickr account, to which you didn’t feel the need to attribute my image (unless that was your attribution, in which case it would be courteous if you actually linked the source).

2. I don’t know where you got the information you stated in the blurb, but “small black dots on the underside” do not distinguish it from similar species.

3. There are geckos that possess eyelids.  There are geckos in the family Eublepharidae that have eyelids.

4. It has not often been debated whether U. phantasticus and U. ebenaui are the same species.  The current debate lies in just how many cryptic species compose the species we currently refer to as U. phantasticus, U. ebenaui, U. finiavana, and U. malama.

5. U. ebenaui and U. phantasticus (as we currently refer to them) are most easily differentiated based on tail length, not number and size of spines.

(Source: oh4theloveofscience)

Hatchling Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus) takes a rest in the process of hatching.
by Mike Martin
Early instar of the Spun Glass Slug Caterpillar, a.k.a. Beutenmueller’s Slug Moth Caterpillar, Isochaetes beutenmuelleri.  Adults look slightly different, but don’t touch this fuzzy caterpillar, those hairs can sting!
Photo by Mike Martin
Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake, Sistrurus miliarius miliarius
by Mike Martin
snake-time:

Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake by Uroplatus phanaticus on Flickr.

I guess I’m getting beat to the chase on my own photographs, but I have a Tumblr of my own, if you’d like to check it out.

snake-time:

Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake by Uroplatus phanaticus on Flickr.

I guess I’m getting beat to the chase on my own photographs, but I have a Tumblr of my own, if you’d like to check it out.

Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake, Sistrurus miliarius miliarius
by Mike Martin
rhamphotheca:

An Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) drags off an Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) that it has killed. Indigo snakes are believed to be immune to snake venom.

That’s not an Eastern Indigo, nor is it an Eastern Diamondback.  It’s a Texas Indigo and a Western Diamondback (as best as I can tell). The white/black banded tail on the rattlesnake is a giveaway, and the Western Diamondback’s range does not overlap (allopatric) with the Eastern Indigo’s range.

rhamphotheca:

An Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) drags off an Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) that it has killed. Indigo snakes are believed to be immune to snake venom.

That’s not an Eastern Indigo, nor is it an Eastern Diamondback.  It’s a Texas Indigo and a Western Diamondback (as best as I can tell). The white/black banded tail on the rattlesnake is a giveaway, and the Western Diamondback’s range does not overlap (allopatric) with the Eastern Indigo’s range.

(via crispysnakes)

Yonahlossee Salamander, Plethodon yonahlossee, Bat Cave variation
by Mike Martin
Yonahlossee Salamander, Plethodon yonahlossee
by Mike Martin
Carpenter Frog, Lithobates virgatipes
by Mike Martin
melklei77:

A five image sequence of two southern pacific rattlesnakes (_Crotalus oreganus_ helleri) mating. I first noticed the pair when I was only a foot or two away from them on a trail; after moving a bit away I captured these five shots of the two snakes wrapping around each other. The top four images were captured over no more than 2 seconds total, and the large image was taken less than 7 seconds after the top four. 
Marc Perkins 

Commonly mistaken for mating, this is actually a combat ‘dance’ between two males.

melklei77:

A five image sequence of two southern pacific rattlesnakes (_Crotalus oreganus_ helleri) mating. I first noticed the pair when I was only a foot or two away from them on a trail; after moving a bit away I captured these five shots of the two snakes wrapping around each other. The top four images were captured over no more than 2 seconds total, and the large image was taken less than 7 seconds after the top four.

Marc Perkins 

Commonly mistaken for mating, this is actually a combat ‘dance’ between two males.

Satanic Leaf-Tailed Gecko, Uroplatus phantasticus
by Mike Martin